Getting climate, energy & environment news right.

Where the Bison Could Roam
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Where the Bison Could Roam

"The first 16 bison were brought to American Prairie in 2005, and their numbers have grown to 774. The reserve has set a goal to settle 6,000 bison on 500,000 contiguous acres, Mr. Heidebrink said. The hardest part of the task, though, has been building up enough land."

Steeped In Purpose: How A Coffee And Tea Company Is Forging A New Kind Of Social Entrepreneurship
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Steeped In Purpose: How A Coffee And Tea Company Is Forging A New Kind Of Social Entrepreneurship

"Designed by Pritzker Prize winning architecture firm, SANAA, Grace Farms has been serving local and global communities since its inception in 2015. Now, Grace Farms Foundation, a not-for-profit private operating foundation that owns and operates Grace Farms, is reinventing social entrepreneurship with a new Certified B Corporation subsidiary called Grace Farms Foods."

Why socialism sickens and capitalism cures
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Why socialism sickens and capitalism cures

Vance Ginn writes about the benefits of capitalism in The Washington Examiner. “Capitalism, with a free market economy of voluntary exchange and limited government, allows spontaneous order with a well-functioning price system to best allocate resources to those who value it most. This results in a compassionate system for people rather than for politicians.”   Read...

Americans throw out 32% of the food they buy. Here’s how to avoid so much waste
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Americans throw out 32% of the food they buy. Here’s how to avoid so much waste

Brian E. Roe writes in The Conversation about food waste in America. “Where does all that unwanted food go? Mainly underground. Food waste occupies almost 25% of landfill space nationwide. Once buried, it breaks down, generating methane, a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Recognizing those impacts, the U.S. government has set a goal of cutting...

Midwest farms are using more cover crops. Why that’s good news.
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Midwest farms are using more cover crops. Why that’s good news.

"Cover crops are used in place of crops intended for sale or animal forage. Farmers most commonly use rye or winter wheat for cover. Instead of being bare and exposed to the elements and erosion, these fields resist erosion. As the crop grows and decomposes, its nutrients are absorbed by the soil. And according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the crops can dry out wet fields before planting and even increase future crop yields."

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